Attorney Claims Trump’s N.J. Golf Course Employed Dozens of Illegals

‘We’re talking about a very high number of employees at the golf club who were not documented, who were also brought in to work there, who may share similar stories…’

Immigration Attorney Claims Trump Golf Course Employs Several Illegal Aliens

Trump National Golf Club Bedminster/IMAGE: The Trump Organization via Youtube

(Kaylee McGhee, Liberty Headlines) An immigration attorney representing five illegal immigrants who worked at President Trump’s New Jersey golf club said he believes there are several others employed at the club.

“It’s my understanding based on what my clients have said, they have friends who also work there,” Anibal Romero told Hill.TV’s Krystal Ball on Monday.

“We’re talking about a very high number of employees at the golf club who were not documented, who were also brought in to work there, who may share similar stories.”

Romero estimated that there may be 12 or 13 illegals still working at the Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J. but that he so far he had only heard from the five women.

The immigrants’ story went public after a lengthy profile feature ran in The New York Times in early December. There is no evidence, it said, that high-up executives at the Trump Organization were aware of the immigrants’ illegal status.

Romero, however, insisted that managers at the golf club knew they were hiring illegals and did it anyway.

“In the case of my clients, they were recruited to come work for the golf club and management there knew who they were hiring,” he said.

One of Romero’s clients, Victorina Morales, told The Times that she illegally crossed the border in 1999 and used “phony” immigration papers to secure employment at the golf course in 2013.

The Trump Organization told The Hill that “if an employee submitted false documentation in an attempt to circumvent the law, they will be terminated immediately.”

But Romero faulted the managers for failing to use an online system set up to determine work-eligibility status.

“Assuming they didn’t know, there’s a document called the I-9, this document is obviously prepared by the employee, but if they were to follow E-Verify, they would probably understand that these women were not authorized to work legally in the United States,” Romero said.

“That was not the case here though, because in this case, the women were brought on to work knowing that they did not have legal status in the United States,” he said.

The article does not clarify what legal recourse Romero intends to pursuit in representing his clients.