Greta Thunberg Slams EU Climate Law as a ‘Surrender’

‘Your childhood is as precious as the climate and if you don’t do something about it, you will lose it forever…’

Greta Thunberg Stuck on Wrong Side of Globe after Refusing to Fly 1

Greta Thunberg / IMAGE: PBS NewsHour via Youtube

(Claire Russel, Liberty Headlines) The European Commission unveiled a new plan this week to combat climate change and reduce carbon emissions, but teen climate activist Greta Thunberg argued it isn’t enough and likened it to a “surrender.”

“‘Net zero emissions by 2050’ for the European Union equals surrender. It means giving up,” she said in an open letter to the EU. “We don’t just need goals for just 2030 or 2050. We, above all, need them for 2020 and every following month and year to come.”

Last year marked the 50th anniversary of climate alarmism, while predictions of an imminent global-warming apocalypse have been present for at least three decades.

The new EU proposal would buy another 30 years of fearmongering, but Thunberg accused world leaders of stalling on a solution.

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“Distant net-zero emission targets will mean absolutely nothing if we just continue to ignore the carbon dioxide budget—which applies for today, not a faraway future,” she said.

The EU proposal would require the bloc’s 27 member states to reach net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen described the Climate Law as a “legal translation of our political commitment,” which  “sets us irreversibly on the path to a more sustainable future.”

After Thunberg dismissed the proposal, European Parliament menber Pietro Fiocchi advised Thunberg to “go back to school.”

According to a leaked draft of the proposals establishing the 2050 goal, the European Commission is proposing a mechanism for regularly raising the EU’s emissions reduction target over the next three decades, but there is no plan for an increase of the EU’s overall emissions goal for 2030.

In the draft, the European Commission said it will review the EU’s current target of a 40% greenhouse gas reduction and “explore options for a new 2030 target of 50% to 55% emission reductions compared with 1990 levels.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.