Rubio Wants Constitutional Amendment to Stop Dems’ Court-Packing Plans

‘Unfortunately, a vocal and increasingly influential progressive minority wants to add seats to the Supreme Court with the explicit goal of ensuring an enduring liberal majority…’

Rubio refuses to campaign against Democratic incumbent in Florida Senate race

Marco Rubio/Photo by Gage Skidmore (CC)

(Lionel Parrott, Liberty Headlines) With Democrats looking forward to packing the courts with leftist activists should they regain power in 2020, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., is urging his colleagues to support his constitutional amendment proposal: keeping the membership of the Supreme Court at nine justices.

The nation’s highest court has stayed at nine justices since 1869. A court-packing scheme by the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration failed in the 1930s.

Rubio, the senior senator from Florida, issued a press release containing a letter addressed to his fellow senators asking for them to sign on to the proposed amendment.

“Unfortunately, a vocal and increasingly influential progressive minority wants to add seats to the Supreme Court with the explicit goal of ensuring an enduring liberal majority on the Court,” Rubio wrote.

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He noted that at least 10 Democrats running for president have embraced court packing.

Left-wing groups advocating for packing the courts argue that doing so would merely “depoliticize” the Court.

But even many liberals say court-packing would undermine both America’s institutions and democracy itself.

Rubio noted that these liberals include former Ruth Bader Ginsburg clerk Richard Primus and former Obama White House counsel Bob Bauer.

Rubio concluded by saying that America’s institutions aren’t perfect, but since the founding “they have provided a framework for our nation to become the most dynamic, most vibrant, and most exceptional nation in all of human history.”

Rubio’s joint resolution proposal currently includes 13 GOP cosponsors.

To pass, the amendment would require two-thirds support from both chambers of Congress, then would go to the states for ratification.

There, three-fourths of state legislative bodies would have to approve of the amendment for it to become part of the Constitution.

So far, no Democrats have expressed interest in signing on to the amendment.