Private Group Building Trump’s Border Wall Given a Cease-and-Desist

‘Any private property owner does not need IBWC’s permission to cut down sugar cane. We can go burn it down if we want to…’

Private Group Building Trump's Border Wall Given a Cease and Desist

Foreman Mike offers an update on wall progress in front of one of the sugar cane fields being cleared by the Rio Grande. / IMAGE: We Build The Wall via Youtube

(Claire Russel, Liberty Headlines) The private group constructing its own wall on the U.S.–Mexico border has been given a cease-and-desist order for attempting to build on private property, according to officials.

The private construction violates the U.S.–Mexico Water Treaty, according to Hidalgo County Judge Richard Cortez, so “the government is going to stop them from building the wall.”

The International Boundary and Water Commission confirmed that they had ordered We Build the Wall, a nonprofit advocacy group, to halt construction.

“Last week, we sent We Build The Wall a letter requesting they wait until they submit the required information and the review process is complete, so we did request that of them before continuing construction, until further review of the project,” Sally Spener, secretary of the commission’s U.S. section, said in a statement to McClatchy.

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But the group hasn’t even begun to build the wall, said the group’s president, Brian Kolfage. Rather, We Build the Wall has been prepping the private sugar cane fields where the wall is supposed to go, and clearing them of debris.

Kolfage said the group will continue to clear the land, regardless of what the Water Commission says.

“There’s not been a stop order. There has been no legal injunction,” Kolfage said, according to Fox6Now.

“The IBWC has no control over us clearing sugar cane … Any private property owner does not need IBWC’s permission to cut down sugar cane. We can go burn it down if we want to. They have no control.”

We Build the Wall raised more than $25 million in donations to construct the promised southern border wall. They’ve already put up about one mile of fencing in New Mexico, according to The New York Times, and they now plan to build a second section along the Rio Grande.