Bill Walton Says Barack Obama Should Be UCLA’s Next Basketball Coach

‘Why do you just turn it down? His brother-in-law coached…’

Bill Walton Says Barack Obama Should Be UCLA’s Next Basketball Coach

Barack Obama/IMAGE: ACC Digital Network via Youtube

(Michael Barnes, Liberty Headlines) From U.S. Senator, to president of the United States, to UCLA basketball coach.

That’s former UCLA hoopster and Boston Celtic legend Bill Walton’s plan for Barack Obama.

Walton uttered the bizarre suggestion during a nationally televised game on Thursday night. The Bruin’s have a head coaching vacancy after the university fired men’s basketball coach Steve Alford on Monday. The team is off to a dismal 7-6 start.

ESPN play-by-play announcer Dave Pacsh asked Walton who he thought would be a good replacement during a lull in Thursday’s game. “What type of characteristics should UCLA look for in its next head coach,” Pacsh asked.

“Barack Obama,” Walton replied.

“Well… I don’t know if he’s going to coach,” Pacsh said, sounding confused.

“You keep saying that, but why,” said Walton. “Why are you so negative?”

Obama has no coaching experience whatsoever—although to be fair, he went from being an ACORN lawyer, to an Illinois state senator, to U.S. Senator and then commander and chief of the most powerful country in the world with few, if any, qualifications.

Walton unwittingly alluded to the fact by suggesting that Obama would be successful because his brother-in-law, Craig Robinson, was a basketball coach.

“Why do you just turn it down? His brother-in-law coached,” Walton scoffed to Pacsh.

Robinson once coached basketball at Brown University—known more as the most liberal Ivy League school than for competitive sports. He also coached at Oregon State University.

Walton was a 7-foot hippie during his UCLA days under legendary coach John Wooden, although he mostly kept his eccentricities under wraps. His long hair and tie-dye persona surfaced during his hall-of-fame NBA career.

As a broadcaster, Walton is known for strange antics and outlandish comments.

He regularly goes off on tangents about art, music and nature, and once played the glockenspiel on the air during a game.

“It’s definitely stretched me as a broadcaster,” Pasch said of his Pac 12 partner.

But Walton’s wackiness may be a perfect fit for a California university setting.

As for Obama—although the West Coast might interfere with his wife’s political aspirations, UCLA would offer a reunion of sorts. His former Homeland Security secretary, Janet Napolitano, is currently president of the entire UC system, despite having no background in education.

One strategy Walton suggested for persuading the ex-president holds true for a good court defense, as well as being a featured political tactic in Saul Alinsky’s “Rules for Radicals”: Keep the pressure on.

“Keep asking until he says no,” Walton said.