WHO’S ENERGIZED? More Republicans than Dems File to Run for Congress

‘I’m tired of seeing my president attacked every day…’

GOP Energy: More Republicans than Democrats Filed to Run for Congress in 2019

Marjorie Greene/PHOTO: Facebook

(Joshua Paladino, Liberty Headlines) Republicans feel greater urgency to win the House and prevent the rule of the new progressive-socialist Democratic Party, new information on candidates running for Congress suggests.

Democrats in 2017 had the momentum, when nearly 1,000 candidates filed to run for the House and Senate, compared to about 700 Republicans, Fox News reported.

But in 2019 Republicans feel inspired to enter the political arena, with 874 candidates filing to run for the House and Senate, compared to 842 Democrats.

Between the impeachment trial and acquittal of President Trump, and radical Democratic policy proposals such as the Green New Deal (climate change) and the New Way Forward Act (immigration), Republicans are ready to fight.

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Marjorie Greene, 45, is an entreprenuer who is running her first congressional campaign for the open seat in Georgia’s 14th district.

“I’m tired of seeing my president attacked every day,” she said. “I’m tired of seeing our future threatened. I’m tired of seeing my children’s future extremely threatened, and it’s time to get off the bench and really step up to the plate.”

Greene named Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., and her extreme ideas as the reason why conservative women like herself must fight against “tyrannical socialist Democrats.”

“These are radical women that will not bend. They do not want to work across the aisle. They only want their policies of the Green New Deal, ‘Medicare-for-all’ and socialism for America,” Greene said. “Oftentimes, it takes a woman to put another woman in her place.”

The past two election cycles have seen more congressional candidates than any other in history.

During the tea-party wave of 2009, Republicans ran more than 700 candidates while Democrats put up about 500, for a total of 1,323 total candidates.

That record was broken in 2017.

But the record-number 1,739 candidates who filed to run for office in 2017 wasn’t a record for long, as 1,761 candidates filed to run for the House and the Senate in 2019.

Spending, too, has far exceeded the 2017 record of more than $800 million.

Candidates raised nearly $1 billion in 2019, with Democrats taking in 53 percent of the money and Republicans taking in the other 47 percent.