Mass. Lawmaker Beats Trans Driver’s License Bill; Forced Votes on ‘All’ 73 Genders

Liberal colleagues couldn’t rule any of the genders out of order without undermining the logic of transgender ideology…

Mass. Lawmaker Beats Trans Driver’s License Bill; Forced Votes on 'All' 73 Genders

Jim Lyons/IMAGE: YouTube

(LifeSiteNews.com) Legislation to add a “Gender X” option to driver’s license should have been a straightforward task in the far-left state of Massachusetts, but one Republican lawmaker managed to derail the bill by taking transgender ideology to its furthest extreme.

The state Senate voted in June to approve the measure, which would have also extended the option to learner’s permits and state identification cards.

No documentation would have been required to prove an applicant is neither male nor female.

“It’s a milestone,” bill sponsor Sen. Karen Spilka, a Democrat, said at the time.

Despite the state House of Representatives being just as heavily Democratic as the Senate, however, it never got the chance to send the bill to liberal Republican Gov. Charlie Baker’s desk.

In a column for the Boston Globe, New England radio host Howie Carr detailed how Republican Rep. Jim Lyons adopted a unique strategy for defeating the bill: forcing it to live up to its supporters’ own logic.

“Since all Democrats must admit that the number of genders is endless, how dare the commonwealth lump all the new genders together as ‘Gender X’?” Carr wrote, summarizing Lyons’ facetious reasoning. “Every gender, he declared, must be listed on Massachusetts driver’s licenses! That was Lyons’ non-negotiable demand. No justice, no peace.”

Lyons told Carr he settled on demanding recognition for 73 different “genders,” as that was the number he reached by tallying the number of custom gender options Facebook offers.

Knowing that his liberal colleagues couldn’t rule any of the genders out of order without undermining the logic of transgender ideology, Lyons introduced each as a separate amendment to the bill the evening of July 31, each requiring 10 minutes of debate and three minutes to vote on…Original Source