Freedom Caucus Co-Founder Amash Won’t Rule Out Libertarian 2020 Run

‘It’s just a different set of people doing the wrong thing…’

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Justin Amash Photo by Gage Skidmore (CC)

(Joshua Paladino, Liberty Headlines) Rep. Justin Amash, R-Mich., who co-founded the House Freedom Caucus, said his conservative colleagues have strayed from the group’s mission because of President Donald Trump’s influence on them.

“From the time the President was elected, I was urging them to remain independent and to be willing to push back against the President where they thought he was wrong,” Amash said, according to CNN. “They’ve decided to stick with the President time and again, even where they disagree with him privately.”

Amash is a Never-Trump Republican with a thoroughly libertarian ideology.

He has opposed many of Trump’s news-grabbing policies, such as the so-called Muslim travel ban and the national emergency declaration to build a wall on the U.S.–Mexico border.

Amash even told the Huffington Post in 2018 that he would support impeachment if Trump pardoned himself.

Amash said the Republican Party’s willingness to support Trump’s executive orders discredits their previous opposition to Obama’s executive overreach.

“In some sense you’ve delegitimized objections to the President,” Amash said of his peers. “You’ve built up such credibility for him that you just can’t challenge him anymore.”

His opposition to foreign intervention, government surveillance, and tax-and-spend policies has not earned him many friends in the Democratic Party, and his resistance to Trump has alienated him from the Republican Party, leading CNN to declare him the “loneliest Republican in Congress.”

Amash said he does not see the Democratic-controlled Congress as much different than the Republican-controlled Congress that he has served in since 2010.

“It’s just a different set of people doing the wrong thing,” he said.

His perceived failure of the two-party system and his disdain for Trump led him to tell Jake Tapper that a run for president as a libertarian in 2020 is an option.

“I would never rule anything out,” Amash said. “That’s not on my radar right now, but I think that it is important that we have someone in there who is presenting a vision for America that is different from what these two parties are presenting.”