ICE Conducts MASSIVE Sweep of Illegals in Sanctuary Cities

Many of the illegal aliens arrested were previously released by sanctuary jurisdictions…

Multiple Illegal Entries, Attacks on Police, Get Alien Only a Year in Prison

Immigration and Customs Enforcement/PHOTO: ICE

(Joshua Paladino, Liberty Headlines) Immigration and Customs Enforcement field offices in Colorado, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Washington, and Wyoming arrested nearly 240 illegal aliens last week, and most of them had criminal histories or pending criminal charges.

These arrests were part of a broader immigration enforcement action throughout the country from Sept. 21 to Sept. 25. Field offices conducted similar operations in New York City, the Hudson Valley, and New Jersey that resulted in nearly 200 additional arrests.

ICE agents removed dangerous illegal aliens from the streets despite resistance from sanctuary jurisdictions.

“Our ICE officers still managed to find and detain many dangerous criminals despite the Colorado law that prohibits local law enforcement jurisdictions from cooperating with ICE,” said John Fabbricatore, acting field office director for Enforcement and Removal Operations Denver. “We continually work to keep our communities safe from Colorado’s misguided priorities of protecting criminal aliens at the expense of its citizens.”

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Colorado and Wyoming ICE officers arrested 42 criminal aliens and immigration violators, ICE reported.

They arrested previously-deported Mexican national Jose Alejandro Lopez-Gutierrez, 56, twice-deported Mexican national Miguel Noe Martinez-Castaneda, 38, and twice-deported Honduran national Sammy Avelino Velasquez-Vasquez.

ICE lodged a detainer on May 25 with the Boulder County Jail for Lopez-Gutierrez after he was charged with felony sexual assault against a child. Boulder County Jail released him three days later, failing to honor the detainer or notify ICE. Agents rearrested him on Sept. 23.

Ignoring an ICE detainer, Denver City Jail released Martinez-Castaneda after arresting him for assault, disturbing the peace, and violation of court orders. The jail failed to notify ICE upon his May 7 release. Agents rearrested him on Sept. 25.

Denver City Jail also ignored a July 18 ICE detainer for Velasquez-Vasquez, who faces charges for drug possession, drug dealing, and having an outstanding warrant. The jail released him on July 27, and it did not inform ICE. Velasquez-Vasquez remains at-large.

The Philadelphia ICE field office arrested 45 illegal aliens last week, including 38-year-old Edward De Oleo Valdez who was convicted of raping a child. After Valdez served his sentence, a Philadelphia prison released him into the public despite an ICE detainer. Forty out of the 45 illegal aliens had criminal convictions or pending criminal charges.

ICE’s Enforcement and Removal Operations Boston arrested 80 illegal aliens last week. Many of the illegal aliens arrested were previously released by sanctuary jurisdictions, ICE reported.

“The arrests of this targeted enforcement action clearly demonstrate the risks to public safety that are posed when jurisdictions adopt policies that prohibit cooperation with immigration enforcement officers,” said Marcos D. Charles, acting field office director for ERO Boston. “Communities that shield criminal aliens by hindering cooperation between ICE and local law enforcement are only increasing the public safety threat in these communities.

Among the illegal aliens arrested in Boston were convicted rapists, assailants, and thieves.

Seattle’s ICE field office arrested almost 60 illegal aliens. More than half of them had criminal convictions (33) and more had pending criminal charges (9). And as ICE reported, “all were violators of U.S. immigration law for their illegal presence in the country.”

“We are not asking local agencies to enforce federal immigration law on ICE’s behalf,” said Nathalie Asher, ICE ERO Field Office Director for the Pacific Northwest. “We are simply asking for a timely notification of an impending scheduled release of a person from jail or prison, so we have the opportunity to take custody of that person in a safe and secure manner.”