Lindsey Graham: Trump Must Compromise w/ Dems on Immigration

‘You literally are going to have multiple millions of people coming from Central America in the next two or three years…’

GRAHAM:

Lindsey Graham / IMAGE: Fox News via Youtube

(Kaylee McGhee, Liberty Headlines) Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., one of President Trump’s closest congressional allies, said the president should try and reach a compromise with Democrats on immigration, arguing that a wall isn’t enough to solve the humanitarian crisis at the southern border.

“Until you change these magnets, these laws, no wall is going to stop the flow,” Graham told reporters on Wednesday, according to Bloomberg.

Graham said that when he met with Trump earlier this week, he told him, “You are going to have to get Democrats in the room. And this is the time for the ‘Tuesday Trump’ to show up.’”

“Tuesday Trump” is a reference to a previous compromise effort Trump agreed to — on a Tuesday — that Democrats had agreed to support.

The president ultimately walked away from the bill, arguing that it didn’t provide enough funding for the wall construction.

Thousands of immigrants are flooding the U.S.-Mexico border seeking asylum in the U.S., backlogging the immigration system and making it impossible for border agents to apprehend those who cross the border illegally.

Graham said American asylum laws, specifically the “catch-and-release” law, have only made the problem worse and will continue to do so until they are changed.

Graham urged Trump to spearhead the effort to change this asylum law to dissuade immigrants from leaving their home countries in the first place.

“You literally are going to have multiple millions of people coming from Central America in the next two or three years unless you shut off the faucet. To the president, you need to do more than talk about fixing it,” Graham said. “You need to fix it.”

Graham is introducing legislation, backed by the Trump administration, that would prohibit immigrants from applying for asylum at the U.S. border.

They would instead have to apply in Mexico or at consulates in their home countries.