Former U.S. Rep. Says the Only Way to Fix Congress is by Abolishing the Senate

‘These sparsely populated, usually conservative states can block legislation supported by a majority of the American people…’

Former U.S. Rep. Says the Only Way to Fix Congress is By Abolishing the Senate

John Dingell/IMAGE: ABC News via Youtube

(Kaylee McGhee, Liberty Headlines) In the latest example of blaming America’s most fundamental institutions for left-wing political failures, former Rep. John Dingell, D-Mich., claimed that the only way to fix Congress is by abolishing the Senate and publicly funding elections.

In an op-ed for The Atlantic, Dingell said these solutions might fix the “unprecedented cynicism about the nobility of public service itself.”

Eliminating money in campaigns completely is the best way to start, Dingell said, because like military service, holding an office is an example of “duty, honor, and service to country.”

Dingell’s strangest suggestion, however, was the eradication of the Senate and “minority rule in our legislative and executive branches.”

Limiting each state to only two senators is “dangerous” and “crazy,” Dingell said.

“Today, in a nation of more than 325 million and 37 additional states, not only is that structure antiquated, it’s downright dangerous,” Dingell wrote in the op-ed.

“California has almost 40 million people, while the 20 smallest states have a combined population totaling less than that. Yet because of an 18th-century political deal, those 20 states have 40 senators, while California has just two. These sparsely populated, usually conservative states can block legislation supported by a majority of the American people. That’s just plain crazy.”

The Senate has created an “imbalance in power,” Dingell wrote, hinting that Republican gains in the Senate during the midterm elections have allowed a “vocal rump of a minority of obnoxious asses” to “hold the entire country hostage to extremist views.”

Dingell also called on Congress to abolish the Electoral College and open presidential elections up to the popular vote.

“Abolish the Senate. At a minimum, combine the two chambers into one, and the problem will be solved,” Dingell wrote. “It will take a national movement, starting at the grassroots level, and will require massive organizing, strategic voting and strong leadership over the course of a generation.”