Fla. Gov. Signs Ban on Sanctuary Cities into Law

‘Florida has once again stepped up when Washington D.C. has failed…’

Ban on Sanctuary Cities to Become Law in Florida

Ron DeSantis/Photo by Gage Skidmore (CC)

(Elizabeth Koh, Tampa Bay Times) Fulfilling a key, controversial campaign promise popular with his party’s base, Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis signed a bill Friday that will ban sanctuary cities in Florida, though the policy is expected to draw a legal skirmish over its constitutionality as it goes into effect next month.

The bill, SB 168, requires local and state law enforcement officials and entities to honor federal immigration detainer requests, which ask a law enforcement agency to detain someone on probable cause that they are removable under federal immigration laws.

It also prohibits local officials from implementing sanctuary policies, which had previously not been defined in state law. There are no sanctuary cities in Florida.

Joined by ally U.S. Rep. Matt Gaetz, who represents the area, and bill sponsor state Sen. Joe Gruters, R-Sarasota, DeSantis told a packed crowd in the chambers of the Okaloosa County Commission that the bill “is about the rule of law” and “public safety.”

“I said we were going to do certain things, and I’m happy to report after having just one legislative session under our belt we’re delivering on the promises we made to the people of Florida,” he said, to applause. He cast sanctuary cities as “law-free zones” where people could arrive illegally and commit crimes, “and then just walk out the door and continue to do it.”

The controversial proposal had been brought before the Legislature before but passed this year in part thanks to DeSantis’ aggressive support. The former congressman had made banning sanctuary cities a key part of his gubernatorial campaign and met regularly with lawmakers throughout the session to ensure it had the votes to pass.

“Florida has once again stepped up when Washington D.C. has failed by passing the strongest ban of sanctuary cities in the country,” Gruters said. “This law ensures we do not treat non-citizens better than Americans and it will help ensure Floridians are not being victimized by illegal aliens.”

Advocates of the bill had contended that the bill would only affect people who had been charged with a crime and ensure compliance with federal laws.

But opponents, including business and immigrants’ rights groups and the American Civil Liberties Union, argued that the bill would have unintended consequences by splitting immigrant families and hurting minority communities.

The issue drew weeks of impassioned, pained testimony on both sides, as well as protests that stirred the Capitol and even disrupted proceedings on the House floor in the final days of the legislative session.

As DeSantis signed the bill into law Friday, some of those groups criticized what they called “one of the worst anti-immigrant laws in the country.”

“Laws like this are proven to negatively impact people in immigrant communities, who will be less likely to report crime to the police or cooperate with investigations, for fear of immigration enforcement against themselves or their neighbors,” said Scott McCoy, senior policy counsel for the Southern Poverty Law Center Action Fund, in a statement. He accused DeSantis and Republican lawmakers of using “racial grievance to drive a wedge between Floridians.”

“It undermines public safety making our towns and cities less safe by requiring local law enforcement to spend less of their time and resources fighting crime in local communities and more on doing the work of federal immigration authorities.”

Andrea Mercado, executive director of the progressive New Florida Majority group, said in a statement that the organization “will back legal challenges to this law.”

Florida is the latest among several states that have taken up or are considering similar policies, including Arkansas, which recently also passed a sanctuary cities ban.

The proposal was a popular issue among DeSantis’ supporters, particularly in the Republican-leaning Panhandle. In rural Okaloosa County, where the bill was signed, interest in DeSantis’ appearance was so high that the event was moved from the county sheriff’s office to the county’s commission chambers in Shalimar, which can hold eight times as many people. Of the county’s 180,000 residents, 6% are Hispanic or Latino.

(Miami Herald staff writer Samantha J. Gross contributed to this report.)

©2019 Tampa Bay Times. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC. Liberty Headlines editor Paul Chesser contributed.