ERIC TRUMP: Dems Miscalculating ‘Long Game’ as Impeachment Bid Backfires

‘People in this country are really upset by what’s happening. They’re pissed off……’

Eric Trump / IMAGE: Fox Business via Youtube

(Ben Sellers, Liberty Headlines) On a conference call with national media outlets, Eric Trump, the son of President Donald Trump, said Democrats had failed to anticipate the “long game” in their current impeachment spectacle.

“They haven’t thought through that we have the majority of the Senate,” he said. “… Not only are they totally gonna fail, they’re gonna be embarrassed.”

Eric Trump said that despite the efforts of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and House Intelligence Chair Adam Schiff, both California Democrats, to carefully control and manipulate the optics surrounding their latest “partisan witch hunt,” GOP leadership in the Senate would have no trouble shifting the narrative in their favor.

“What [Democrats] haven’t figured out is that if this goes to the senate it’s gonna be [Senate Majority Leader] Mitch McConnell’s turn, and guess who he gets to call— he gets to call Barack Obama.”

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That would likely mean pressing the former president on his knowledge and approval of ethically questionable conduct in Ukraine during his administration which would have justified Trump pressing the former Soviet satellite to investigate further.

While much of the Left’s case rests on the supposition that Trump sought a “quid pro quo” arrangement, many have dismissed the notion that there was anything out of the ordinary about his request.

“They’re trying to orchestrate baggage that doesn’t exist,” said Eric Trump during the media call.

The current Ukraine controversy—stemming from a July 25 phone call—began almost immediately after Democrats failed in their efforts to smear the president with allegations of Russian collusion.

“I’ve seen this movie before and it’s never worked out,” said Eric Trump. “… They’ve always fallen flat on their face.”

Supporters maintain that Trump’s concerns of Ukrainian corruption were valid—that the country’s embassy sought to interfere in the 2016 election and that its leadership was closely aligned with Democratic 2020 front-runner Joe Biden.

Biden’s son Hunter was on the board of an influential energy company, Burisma, until April of this year.

After Burisma lobbied high-level State Department officials, Joe Biden, while serving as Obama’s vice president, threatened to withdraw a billion-dollar loan if Ukrainian officials did not fire the prosecutor who was investigating the company.

Democratic Senators have cautioned that Republicans’ declared plans to place Biden and his son Hunter on the stand could backfire.

Sen. Chris Coons, D-Del., who holds the seat long occupied by the elder Biden during his 36-year congressional career, said forcing him to testify “would be literally rolling a grenade down the aisle of the Senate.”

But Republican supporters of the president, including his second son, say that the damage to congressional bipartisanship has already been done after Democrats initiated the sham process along party lines.

“This is a beltway charade and these people are totally estranged from real Americans,” said Eric Trump.

He said said the other side had “lost tremendous credibility” after the Russia hoax and prior efforts to smear Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh during his confirmation last year.

“People in this country are really upset by what’s happening,” Trump said. “They’re pissed off…”

His father’s campaign had benefited tremendously from the impeachment debacle by bringing in massive fundraising totals, he added.

During the call, Rick Gorka, the deputy communications director for the Republican National Committee, broke the news to participating journalists that the campaign had raised more than $3 million in small donations over the last 24 hours since public impeachment hearings began in the House.

Meanwhile, Eric Trump said impeachment was the Left’s “Hail Mary” effort to compensate for the inadequacies of its declared pool of 2020 contenders.

While successful candidates—including his father and former presidents Clinton, Bush and Obama—all exuded a charismatic quality that bolstered voter enthusiasm into campaign momentum, the current flock of Democrat hopefuls lack the sort of broad appeal needed to pose serious competition to the incumbent president.

“They don’t have their all-star lineup,” said Eric Trump.