Climate-Change Committee Dissolved by Trump Regroups, Releases Report

‘The point is to take what we know, make it usable for the communities and increase their confidence in weighing the trade-offs and opportunities…’

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(Lionel Parrott, Liberty Headlines) President Donald Trump dissolved a government advisory group dealing with climate change back in 2017.

But on Thursday, they released a report anyway.

According to CNN, the Advisory Committee for the Sustained National Climate Assessment never stopped meeting because they considered their work too important.

Created in 2015 by President Obama, the group was designed to help local leaders apply knowledge from the National Climate Assessment, an ongoing U.S. inter-agency effort dealing with climate-change issues.

The National Climate Assessment’s latest report, released in November, paints a bleak picture. It says climate change could cost the economy hundreds of billions of dollars and kill thousands of Americans.

Moreover, the report says climate change isn’t just a future problem, and that the effects are already being felt now.

The Trump administration dissolved the committee following concerns about its membership. An administration official noted at that time that the 15-member committee only had one person representing industry.

Following its dissolution, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo came to the group’s rescue, with it becoming the Science to Climate Action Network (SCAN) and retaining most of its members.

“While the federal government continues to deny climate change and ignore the dire need to strengthen the resilience of our communities, New York and the U.S. Climate Alliance are taking action,” said Cuomo. “This report will provide important recommendations to communities across the country as we work to address climate change.”

In addition to working with universities and advising local leaders on mitigating the impact of climate change, SCAN is also working to determine which climate models are reliable—a contentious issue, to say the least.

Richard Moss, chairman of the committee, said he hopes the report will empower local communities to act.

“The point is to take what we know, make it usable for the communities and increase their confidence in weighing the trade-offs and opportunities that come with different strategies for adaptation and mitigation,” he said.

It is unknown if the Green New Deal is among those strategies.