GOP Sens. Introduce Constitutional Carry States’ Rights Act

‘This legislation would help ensure that gun owners exercising Constitutional carry will no longer be stuck with confusing laws…’

GOP Sens. Introduce Constitutional Carry States' Rights Act

Mike Rounds/IMAGE: YouTube

(Lionel Parrott, Liberty Headlines) U.S. Sen. Mike Rounds (R-S.D.) introduced legislation on Thursday that would protect Second Amendment rights for individuals located in states with Constitutional carry laws.

The legislation was co-sponsored by Sen. Mike Enzi (R-Wyoming), among others.

Both senators touted the bill, called the “Constitutional Carry States’ Rights Act,” in respective press releases.

The legislation would close a loophole in the Gun-Free School Zones Act, enacted in 1990.

That law makes it a federal crime to possess a firearm within 1000 feet of a school zone.

There are exceptions for law enforcement and for individuals who are licensed by the state to possess a firearm.

The loophole: In “constitutional carry” states where a concealed carry permit is not required, individuals are not licensed by the state to possess a firearm because no license is necessary.

Thus, federal law perversely punishes individuals who live in states with greater Second Amendment freedoms, like South Dakota.

“In South Dakota, we greatly value our right to bear arms,” said Rounds. “This legislation would close federal loopholes in the Gun-Free School Zones Act to make certain South Dakotans who choose to exercise their Second Amendment Rights are treated the same as those who possess a concealed handgun with a permit.”

Sen. Mike Enzi released a similar statement, saying: “Many folks in Wyoming exercise their Second Amendment right to keep and bear arms every day. This legislation would help ensure that gun owners exercising Constitutional carry will no longer be stuck with confusing laws about where they can and can’t have their firearms.”

Other cosponsors of the Constitutional Carry States’ Rights Act include Sens. Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.), Mike Braun (R-Ind.), Kevin Cramer (R-N.D.), Josh Hawley (R-Mo.), and Mike Lee (R-Utah).

Except for Lee, these are all freshman senators who were elected last November.

Should the legislation make it out of the Republican-controlled Senate, it will need support from the Democratic-controlled House and the signature of President Trump to become law.