Chick-fil-A Lovers Sue San Antonio for Banning the Christian Restaurant

‘The continued religious ban on Chick-fil-A by the San Antonio City Council has left citizens with no choice but to take this case to court…’

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(Joshua Paladino, Liberty Headlines) Five Chick-fil-A lovers in Texas sued the city of San Antonio because it banned the Christian chicken restaurant from operating in the San Antonio International Airport.

Patrick Von Dohlen, Brian Greco, Kevin Jason Khattar, Michael Knuffke and Daniel Petri filed the lawsuit on Sept. 5, contending that it violates Senate Bill 1978.

Republican Gov. Greg Abbott signed the bill—otherwise known as the Save Chick-Fil-A Bill— into law in June, Fox News reported. It took effect Sept. 1.

SB 1978 prevents state and local governments in Texas from discriminating against businesses or peoples on the basis of their affiliation with religions.

“The continued religious ban on Chick-fil-A by the San Antonio City Council has left citizens with no choice but to take this case to court,” said Jonathan Saenz, president of Texas Values Action, according to The Texas Tribune. “Any other vendor that tries to replace Chick-fil-A at the airport will be doing so under a major cloud of long and costly litigation with the city.”

The plaintiffs asked the district court in Bexar County, Texas to rule that the San Antonio City Council “violated and continues to violate” the law by barring Chick-fil-A from opening a restaurant in the airport.

The San Antonio City Council decided to ban Chick-fil-A from the airport due to the company’s support for Christian organizations that oppose the country’s acceptance of and praise for homosexuality–what the city council described as a “legacy of anti-LGBTQ behavior.”

The plaintiffs also asked the court to prevent San Antonio from “taking any adverse action against Chick-fil-A or any other person or entity, which is based wholly or partly on that person or entity’s support for religious organizations that oppose homosexual behavior.”

Laura Mayes, the chief communications officer for the city of San Antonio, accused the plaintiffs of using “the court to advance their political agenda.”

“Among the many weaknesses in their case, they are trying to rely on a law that did not exist when Council voted on the airport concessions contract,” Mayes said. “We will seek a quick resolution from the Court.”