Rebellion Against Common Core as Cursive Makes Comeback

(Quin Hillyer, Liberty Headlines) Longtime critics of the Common Core educational standards increasingly can sign their names to policy successes on one major front of their battle.

For at least six years, one of many criticisms of the Core was that it deliberately de-emphasized cursive writing (sometimes called writing “in script”) in favor of teaching “keyboard skills.” Just as with the controversial mathematics-instruction methods pushed by Common Core, the Core’s preference for technology over handwriting basics is another example of the standards’ emphases on things trendy and newfangled ahead of the tried and true.

PREVIOUSLY: How Common Core Damages Students’ College Readiness

Proponents of cursive now are successfully fighting back, with Arizona, Louisiana and Alabama this coming academic year joining at least 11 other states once again requiring or at least promoting cursive writing as part of their schools’ curriculum.

A week ago, the online publication Quartz featured a lengthy story about the comeback of cursive writing and the excellent educational and scientific reasons for it.

“What we found was that children until about grade six were writing more words, writing faster, and expressing more ideas if they could use handwriting—printing or cursive—than if they used the keyboard,” University of Washington professor Virginia Berninger told the Washington Post.

And, reports Quartz, “Brain scans during the two activities also show that forming words by hand as opposed to on a keyboard leads to increased brain activity (pdf). Scientific studies of children and adults show that wielding a pen when taking notes, rather than typing, is associated with improved long-term information retention, better thought organization, and increased ability to generate ideas.”

Further explanation from the same article:

It may well be that the physicality of shaping letters cements concepts in the mind. For example, to type the word “typing,” I made the same motion on the keyboard six times, choosing which letter to type but not forming them. But if I were to write the same thing by hand, I’d have to shape six different letters and put them together. That takes more effort and seems to both demand more of the brain and leave a deeper imprint on the mind than typing. That imprint appears to be critical when learning new things.

And researchers from Princeton have found that taking notes on machines leads to “shallower processing” of information in the brain because “laptop note takers’ tendency to transcribe lectures verbatim rather than processing information and reframing it in their own words is detrimental to learning.”

Finally, when this Liberty Headlines reporter first summed up the pro-cursive arguments from experts in 2011, he found:

Also, there is the practical consideration of the role cursive plays in official public documents. The unique, identifying value of the personal signature is an essential part of contracts and other transactions that can’t be duplicated electronically. Especially as computer hackers become increasingly adept at their evil arts, the cursive signature should be more, not less, of a necessary safeguard against fraud.

The individuality of an old-fashioned signature serves another, more intangible role. Electronic keyboard communication is homogenizing, tending towards the impersonal, and often less expressive. It also promotes sloppiness. Cursive writing, on the contrary, requires character-building effort to maintain legibility. As described in a marvelous 1951 book called Written By Hand, by Englishman Aubrey West, “While in speech any slovenliness of articulation which the easy of conversation may invite can be at once amended – for your hearer will invite you to repeat more intelligibly what he has not distinctly heard – there is in writing [by hand] no opportunity for correction: so that any real illegibility in writing is a wider breach of good manners than indistinct utterance.”

Finally, no email message can fully replace the civilizing and personalizing value of a hand-written note of thanks or condolence. It can even be argued that a culture eschewing such civilizing touches is morally and perhaps spiritually poorer.

As noted above, this is just one of many issues involved in the national fight about Common Core. Proponents say that common standards will raise the level of educational attainment nationwide and provide a better way to measure and compare educational results. Opponents argue – among numerous other criticisms – that homogenized standards lead to counterproductive “uniformity, standardization, and compliance,” according to Robert Holland of the Heartland Institute. “The result could retard successful innovation rather than promote it.”

As is shown by the growing backlash against the Core’s techno-infatuation, and in favor of cursive writing, anybody who wants a drama about a battle pitting parents at the grassroots level against bureaucratized educational centralizers could not have written a better… well a better script.

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  • helm20558

    Its about time.

  • richjack4

    Although not advertised, much of the prior dumbing down of core content standards was the mistaken belief that it was “culturally insensitive”. Read into that what you will.

    • Ladypyro

      You’re absolutely correct. “Common Core” dumbed down everything so that the lowest average became the norm. Excelling has held little reward and isn’t challenging enough for those bright kids when all that is expected is a participant trophy. They need to add back in history and civics and science. They also need to add in the AP classes. We need to challenge these kids and not let them settle for the norm

      • richjack4

        During my time as a high school accounting teacher, I ran into many of these “standards”. There is nothing in your post that I can argue with.

      • Lqqkout

        or mediocre.

      • satcatchet

        It’s working in the third world nations and for the Muslims.

  • herb portere

    Thank God Cursive will come back…the last few generations benefited by cursive…and so will the next generations!

    • AKLady2015

      It will only work out if they go back to teaching it with the old-fashioned, shape drills. Else, the schools will produce the type of writers that led to cursive being dropped.

      • Warren Blum

        They didn’t have the time to give these kids the right teaching. With technology coming in the school districts dropped these writing programs and geared towards keyboarding. But you’re half right.

        • AKLady2015

          There is simply not enough time in a school day, or school year, to teach everything that needs to be taught. America needs to adopt the school years as it exists in Canada and Europe. In those countries, school is in session all through the year with only short vacation lasting just a couple of weeks,

          • Warren Blum

            Holy crap. I agree with u. And start dropping some of the course work that has interfered with , let’s call it, the 3 R’s

          • satcatchet

            It was just a matter of time we all would read that from you.

      • satcatchet

        Kinda like riding your bike differentially from the way I ride mine?
        It’s the teachers responsibility to correct any errors. Like 2+2=4 not 5 as your commie core suggests.

  • Nonpc

    Classical, Christian school is making a comeback. This was the type of education our brilliant founding fathers were educated with. Children leave the 12th grade with a Christian world view and are VERY prepared for higher education at the University level. I would highly recommend this type of education if you loathe what the government has done to our public schools…. i.e. turning them into atheistic, left-wing indoctrination factories.

    • AKLady2015

      Not all such schools make the grade. While visiting family in Alabama, I’ve seen some of the worst school that you could possibly imagine. Some people advocate illiteracy and ignorance over segregation.

      • Nonpc

        And public schools are definitively not making the grade nation-wide.

        • AKLady2015

          The only school making “the grade” are the very expensive private schools. The majority of those are locates in the Northeast. Schools below the Mason-Dixon Line have always been sub-par. Prior to the mid-1960s, schools in black neighborhoods did not even have qualified teachers.
          On of the women I attended graduate school with was a Milwaukee School teacher. Milwaukee distributes its school funding in per portion to the tax base. She taught at an inner city school. Ten of her students had to share one textbook. I photocopied worksheets at my business for her class, so she could have sufficient teaching materials. She purchased many teaching aids out of her own funds.
          In contrast, the students in Whitefish Bay, the rich neighborhood, were provided laptop computer paid for by school taxes. Their parents could have afforded to provide that equipment.

          • satcatchet

            You need to proof read before you post. Your graduate degree isn’t helping you.

          • DarwinsMyth

            I would guess, that those “very expensive private schools” aren’t applying Common Core teaching and ideas, either. Home schooling is doing better than public/government ran schools, and I know, they sure aren’t applying Common Core.

      • Warren Blum

        Yes the demorats do to keep the votes from these illiterates.

      • satcatchet

        That’s called your Common Core at work.

    • Strongboy1770

      Sorry nonpc, religion and state are separate in this country. That is the genius of Jefferson and Madison, eho were not universally adored in their own time. If you want your children to have a Christian worldview, you must inculcate it at home and church, or send your children to a Christian private school. I sent mine to yeshivah (Jewish private school). As a biology teacher, I accepted that my job was “to teach, not to preach,” and I didn’t have a problem with that. Biology, as a natural science, is inherently apolitical and amoral. Science is an evidence-based, not a holy-book-based, way of knowing about the natural world. We go where the evidence leads us, and if someone has a religious or cultural problem with that, it is not my problem, at least during working hours. I’m not here to make atheists or believers out of my students. Science says nothing about God; it does NOT say that God is nothing. Being in New York, I could fall back on the Regents curriculum and the Regents Examination if parents complained. Having a federally mandated Common Core for science and math strengths my position and also makes it easier to compare American children’s educational attainments with those of students from other countries with whom we compete.

      • DarwinsMyth

        Nowhere in the U.S. Constitution does it say, there’s a separation of Church and State. If there was, Congress would not have approved the Holy Bible to be taught in the schools of the U.S., in the 1780s. Congress would not have had “In God We Trust” printed on our money in the 1860s. The “separation” is one-sided, where the government won’t tell the church how to run its churches. Atheists have been trying to rewrite history for awhile, now.

        • Strongboy1770

          The Constitution has been shaped by some 225 years of case law in the courts, as anyone with any familiarity with it knows. It has been accepted for a long time that the government may not tell Christians, or Jews, Muslims or anybody else, what to believe or how to worship, nor may religion dictate curriculum to public schools or compel students to practice a particular religion. When the Republic was founded it was so overwhelmingly Protestant that there weren’t enough others to complain effectively about compulsory Protestant observance in public schools. Today, thank God, all that changed. As for the Bible, it may not be READ devotionally but it may be STUDIED as one of the greatest literary works (bad translation notwithstanding) that Western civilization ever produced. It is not the framers’ or the justices’ fault that school principals (mostly female) don’t have any balls.

          • DarwinsMyth

            Past practice shows, that when the U.S. Constitution talks of Freedom of Religion, it’s talking about the many denominations of Christianity, not other beliefs, like Islam, or Buddhism, or Hinduism, etc… For example… it was Congress that endorsed and approved the Holy Bible (Christianity) to be taught in every school in the U.S., in the 1780s. The Founding Fathers didn’t approve the Qu’ran (or another religious teaching from another belief) to be taught in any school. And it was that way until about 1960, when atheists talked the courts into creating law, instead of interpreting it.

      • satcatchet

        Your right BUT back then Christianity was so much stronger back in Jefferson’s day. People did the right things like teach the children how to do the 3 R’s. The children were tought respect. They were tought how to be young men & women so when they grow up with dignity. They were enjoyable to be around in others presents. They could carry on a conversation in length.

        They didn’t kill you just because you looked at him/her.

        Back then they obayed the 10 Cammandments but there were the bunch of spastics that stirred up trouble and delt with without the PC crowd.

      • Nonpc

        Thanks, I am well aware of that. Classical Christian schools are private schools and they are a great option for those who want a choice when it comes to public schools.

    • satcatchet

      Home schooling has been rocking right along quite nicely for 35 years now and is kicking the daylights out of CC.

  • Jerry Kimbro

    Many legal papers require a signature, how can we ignore that?

    • satcatchet

      Whaaa baaam! You just gave me a money making idea.

  • LCraig

    Strong believer that a persons education level can be found in the style of their writing.

  • AKLady2015

    Now the question is which style will be taught? My grandmother taught me Zaner long before I started school. I was always getting in trouble because the school taught Palmer.

    • Warren Blum

      Can you write now? You must do well with your Zaner ball and stick figures. Palmer is just simple real writing . Stop trying to impress ur demorat lib buddies with these old fancy terms.

      • Naval Lint

        She’s pedantic, condecending and arrogant. She’s also a fully-indoctrinated member of the Lefty Loony Bin. You waste your time with this one.

        • satcatchet

          Another lost soul, tisk tisk.
          The truth will set you free but libtards refuse the truths so they are destine for uter destruction.

  • Klaus Krauthammer

    The poor flakes not only can’t write, there printing is barely legible. Because of technology many of them can’t communicate verbally. It’s a real problem in the labor force. Another democrat gift of moron making.

    • AKLady2015

      Actually, it has been that way since the 1970s.
      It started when Republicans cut education funding.
      If Trump gets his way, education funding will be cut further.

      • DarwinsMyth

        Wrong. I was going to school in the 1970s, and we weren’t using computers, were still being taught cursive, and using our brains to add numbers, rather than using a calculator to do it. Can blame Democrats all the way for how things are in schools… along with being ran by overpaid union workers instead of money going to our kids’ education…. and then, when the teachers need to get fired, they aren’t fired because the union defends them. Common Core is the brainstorm of inept Democrats.

        • AKLady2015

          We had three children in school during the 1970s. As a military family, our chidden attended schools in multiple states. I’ve seen the beat and the worst this country has to offer. It is financial issue, not a political one. Poor areas have questionable school systems. Rich states have good schools.

          For military families, Common Core is a gift from God. Every time we were transferred, the new school district was either ahead or behind the one we left. People in the commercial sector face the same problems when their companies transfer them. We have become a mobile society. Common Core benefits the majority.

          • DarwinsMyth

            Common Core is a nightmare. It’s not logical. The instructions aren’t clear, and the kids don’t understand it. The teachers are even frustrated by the garbage. One day, for homework, my 3rd grader brought home just 1 problem for homework. Kids aren’t being taught anymore by the teachers, and the weight of the teaching is being pushed unto the parents, or else, the kids will get bad grades.

            When I went to school, my parents didn’t need to help me, because I understood the instructions without much help, and I received plenty of homework. There’s a reason why education is in the dumps in the U.S.. For all the money spent in the U.S. on education, we should be #1… instead, the U.S. is ranked 39th in math, 24th in science, and #24th in reading, in the world, among 15 yr olds, in 2015.

          • AKLady2015

            Teaching has always been a parental responsibility. Learning requires repetition. Homework is what provides the needed practice time.

            Frankly, I found school very boring. Those were the days before “gifted” programs. Thankfully, the CLEP Exams became available. Thankfully, the State of New York and the State of Connecticut developed systems where people could obtain college degrees through testing.

            The U.S. has never consistently led the world in education. We’ve trailed in both math and science for over 50 years.

          • DarwinsMyth

            Teaching might be the parents responsibility at home, but not at school. I also believe in… repetition is the mother of all learning. I grew up in a single parent home, so my mother was working when I was doing my homework, and I am sure glad, that I didn’t have to fight through Common Core instructions and illogic.

          • AKLady2015

            You statements indicate you have no idea as to what Common Core actually is. It means a student at XYZ school can move across town to ABC school and no be either ahead or behind at the new school.
            .
            When we were transferred from Alaska to South Carolina, the effect was that our children were required to basically repeat almost a year of schooling they had already completed. Because we were “outsiders,” our children were not permitted to take up any of the limited “gifted program” space. The state law did not permit them to be put ahead a grade. Their father took part-time job so we could send them to private school.

          • DarwinsMyth

            The Common Core is a set of high-quality
            academic standards in mathematics and English language arts/literacy
            (ELA). These learning goals outline what a student should know and be
            able to do at the end of each grade.

            Sorry… but I don’t see, what you’re talking about, being in that paragraph. What you’re talking about sounds like grades are ignored, which I know, they aren’t. Also, that is assuming all teachers are teaching the exact same thing on any given day, and I know, that’s not true, either. What I’m going to assume though, that Eureka math is apart of the Common Core teaching, and it is inferior to what I was taught in school.

            I just looked it up, and Eureka math is a Common Core-aligned curriculum published by the non-profit Great Minds Inc..

          • AKLady2015

            Common core is about consistency.

            It is about every child be provided a quality basic education. It means a child can go from one school in a state to another school and not feel as though they were just dumped on the Moon.

            As a military family, pur children changed school districts almost every two years. The school system in South Carolina was almost a full year behind Alaska. What was 5th grade in Alaska was 6th grade in SC.

            We had to put our children is private school so they did not sit bored to death for an entire school year.

          • DarwinsMyth

            What’s funny, I went from one school to another… in grade school, and never felt I was dumped on the moon. Kids can handle it… I used to be one. You obviously don’t know it… but there are schools that are still behind other schools… you can see the grading of schools, in every county in the U.S., and it’s not pretty (it can be Googled).

            I don’t see how holding back smart kids from learning more is a good thing, just to make slower kids feel better (from one school to the next). Political Correctness is a cover-up for jealousy and weak minds, and people should learn to get over it… that maybe, their kids just aren’t as smart as other kids.

          • AKLady2015

            Common Core has nothing, whatsoever, to do with “holding back smart kids from learning more.” It has to do with insuring children in all parts of the country have access o a good education. If supported, it might even bring America schools back on a even keel with Canada and Europe. Our schools have been failing. They have not produced young adults able to read, write or do math — for decades,

          • satcatchet

            Really? You just don’t get it do you? You are a prime example of Common Core.

          • AKLady2015

            You should not make assumptions.
            My grandchildren are in college.

          • cindy galt

            Well, we moved from CA to GA and my son’s AP classes from CA did measure up to the ones in GA – so much for Common Core!

          • satcatchet

            Yep, if you want to transform a country into a bent nwo follower, you start with the kiddos. You dumb them down so they can not reason for themselves and you can tell them what you what them to believe. Fake news leaders, open boarders and islam (shariah law) importation are part of the agenda.

            Common Core=ignorance

          • satcatchet

            And just support that with some analyses.
            Please indulge use and take our breath away with your intelligence.

            Crickets are serenading us all for now with your stupidity.

          • Klaus Krauthammer

            Again it’s the parents lack of involvement but yet the teacher gets blamed for the kid not ever doing a lick of homework or studying for tests. Think of the illegitimate birthrates in obamas Chicago. That place is hopeless. With all the tax money that town has extorted it should be in great shape.

          • DarwinsMyth

            With my experience this past school year, with a certain 3rd grader, the teacher was very much under performing in his teaching responsibilities. The teachers are getting paid to be teachers, not the parents. Parents are supposed to support their kids, and help where they can. Since schools are always changing the curriculum, we shouldn’t expect parents to keep up. If the curriculum was understandable, wouldn’t need the parents so much. There are teachers that are even frustrated with the Common Core curriculum, so how can the parents be expected to teach it, whom weren’t taught to be teachers, or, have been out of school for 20 years themselves? In my case, I’ve been out of school for 38 years, but my 3rd grader did well, in spite of the ineptness of the teacher.

          • Klaus Krauthammer

            Your 3rd grader must have had support from you the parent. Even in occupied kaliforniah the percentage of bad teachers is small. They get evaluations and time for improvement. There are steps to help them or fire them. The UC system is where you get horrid politicized bullies on the left which greatly gets in the way of real teaching.

          • DarwinsMyth

            Yes… I gave her some good support with her homework, but it wasn’t without some straining of some brain cells when trying to understand the instructions, which were vague many times. It was as if, the instructions were written in English by someone whose first language wasn’t English. She, as a 3rd grader, had no idea most of the time.

            Of course, a teacher that I would call “bad”, someone else might not see it, or, someone might let it slide because their child isn’t having that same teacher again next year.

          • Klaus Krauthammer

            Good luck. Our country is occupied with the entire turd world. We have lost our compass and the lunatics and parasites are in charge now. You are going to have to give your child much knowledge which she will never get at the public schools or universities. Money management should be required by 2 courses every semester from 8th grade on. Financial responsibility is the last thing the gubmit schools will ever teach. They need armies of useful idiots to further the debt owed to the privately owned Federal Reserve Bank. Nothing federal about it. And then there is the IMF, World Bank, Bank of International Settlements and more which get our tax dollars. I went way out of the conversation but there is much to learn after the basics about who runs the world government or New World Order. It’s maddening but addictive. It’s like a gang of money wizards. It is a gang of money wizards.

          • DarwinsMyth

            I agree. The swamp is huge, and it’s size was probably doubled, or tripled, during the Obama Administration. And, there isn’t a month that doesn’t go by, when I think, is my money safe in the savings account?

          • Klaus Krauthammer

            It’s all fractional banking. It used to be when you deposit a dollar the bank could loan out ten dollars for each dollar. Might be more now. It’s all financial fiction. Think of your IRA or 401k, they are just digits on a screen that you can print out. Luckily we can sell them for cash so far. Think of the debt of over 20 trillion and another 120 trillion of unfunded liabilities. No math in the universe is available to figure out how to pay that back. The dirty secret is the states and federal gangsterment walk up to the privately owned Federal Reserve Bank every day to borrow more money to run their fraud welfare programs and more. The last thing the Federal Reserve owners want is for any politicians or presidents to pay down that debt. That is their gravy train. The country is in a constant state of bankruptcy. You have to guess what these vampires have taken from the country in receivership over the decades. I think federal land and U.N. land is really their land behind the curtain. They are very powerful. When the 5 men who started the Fed Reserve all agreed and set in motion in 1913 they very quickly started running both political parties. Everyone is in place in both parties to keep that debt building. We are there debt slaves the second we are born until death. Think deep about that.

          • satcatchet

            It should but too many common core functionlly illiterates with university degrees hanging on their me wall can’t think of anything but ripping off their neighbors. Theft of education is transformed into theft of civil obediance and respect for those that have established the a once great city.

            Yeah, Common Core, Karl Marx is loving it.

          • Klaus Krauthammer

            Well said.

          • AKLady2015

            Obama grew up in Hawaii.

            He worked for three years from June 1985 to May 1988 as director of the Developing Communities Project (DCP), a church-based community organization originally comprising eight Catholic parishes in 1992, he returned to Chicago when the University of Chicago Law School provided Obama with a fellowship and an office.

          • AKLady2015

            The content of your post says you have no idea, whatsoever, as to what “Common Core” entails.

          • DarwinsMyth

            I know exactly what it is… it’s a nightmare, just as I said. Your
            condescending remark won’t change that fact. Put the educational system
            into the hands of Democrats and they’ll ruin it, like everything else
            they wrap their warped minds around. The stats show it all, and your other comments only reiterate, how and why, smart children are being dumbed down, just so those who are slow can keep up… thanks to Common Core.

          • AKLady2015

            The Common Core State Standards Initiative is an educational initiative in the United States that details what, at a minimum, K–12 students should know in English language arts and mathematics at the end of each grade.

            Since Common Core only applies to math and English, how does it accomplish keeping “smart children dumbed down, just so those who are slow can keep up”.

          • Strongboy1770

            But they always elevated themselves with outside reading and study.

          • AKLady2015

            Just what does that have to do with Common Core?
            Why do you object to a law that sets the “minimum” education levels?
            The law says school cannot provide less,
            nothing in the law prohibits providing more.

          • Strongboy1770

            You misunderstand. I’m not complaining about Common Core. I taught science, not math or English, so I was never affected by it. I’m just saying that smart kids never limited themselves to minimum standards.

          • AKLady2015

            That is if they had access to additional materials.
            Some neighborhoods do not have public libraries.
            Not all schools have an adequate number of textbooks.
            Milwaukee stood as a prime example back in the late 80s, early 90s
            School tax funds were distributed based on the tax base.
            There was one book for every ten children at inner city schools.
            There was a laptop computer for every child in Whitefish Bay. An area where parents could easily afford to buy such “toys”.

          • Strongboy1770

            I know about textbook (and lab equipment) shortages only too well, having taught in inner city schools in Brooklyn. I was constantly agitating to rectify that outrage, and was forced to retire early. But in Brooklyn almost everybody is in walking distance of a public library.

          • Lillyhammer Lip

            And you obviously have been dropped on your head and suffered a concussion. Common core is USELESS. Leave it to the democrats to screw up the educational system. But the federal government has no business dictating/ interfering in education. Let the State and local governments run the system. There are good and I there are bad teachers…mostly good ones. However there are many administrators who are worthless. We need school board members with some common sense, a backbone and a valid higher education to select teachers and administrators to achieve an effective school system.

          • AKLady2015

            You obviously have no idea, whatsoever, as to what Common Core is about. Lilly, your state is more than welcome to kick the fed out of your school system. However, the federal money leaves as well.

            As for your childish insult, I am quite certain that my family has had far wider experience with the school districts across these United Sates than you have. We were transferred roughly every two years. When we were lucky, the transfer took place in the summer. Our children attended schools in New Mexico, Oklahoma, Maine, Connecticut, Alaska, South Carolina, Florida, Guam. Wisconsin, Alaska …

          • Strongboy1770

            Gee, I thought I had a problem when a student moved from the Bronx to Brooklyn, where I taught. Now I know, if I needed reminding, that not only soldiers sacrifice for their country, so do their families. We are all in your debt.

          • satcatchet

            Yes and I want a reimbursement for all the pencles, notebook paper, cryolas, porter board, etc. Common Core is communism. If I want to provide for a needy child I will and Common Core is an excise for the school systems. I don’t need or want people or a system to dictate to me who I need to provide for. That’s why we pay school tax people. Our taxes are supposed to provide for the needs of the class rooms. Kinda like the Social Security sytem. Every branch of our government dips into that so called security for the elderly fund. It ain’t secure anymore.

          • AKLady2015

            Thank you. I’m more of an optimist. I appreciate the cultural exposure and learning our lives provided. Our children were given opportunity that many do not experience in their entire life. Yes, there are sacrifices, however, there are also rewards.

          • satcatchet

            Please don’t have any more children poster child.

          • Lillyhammer Lip

            So the money leaves the school system which comes from, collectively all other states. Basically then the federal government has complete control of ALL PROPAGANDA that it can muster
            SO WHAT? GOOD? I think not. And as far as your statement that YOU have had “far greater experience with school districts across the United States” than I have just because YOU have been transferred here and there through military matters—YOU have no idea what or where or what experience I have had with this system. I am not impressed by the areas you have been in. You made the choice to enter the military—and I did as well–but that doesn’t mean Common
            Core is correct for everyone. It may have worked well for you and others but overall it was a big mistake. I for one AM IN THE SCHOOL SYSTEM and have been for many years. Common Core has had many names before and will only change in name in the future. What will remain is the same BS that it continues to push with the end result being to deny the deserved education that all students are entitled to. The “dumbing down” of our educational system is in place and it NEEDS TO STOP! So you have been to all these wonderful places and it seems to me YOU have not learned anything. SAD. VERY SAD!

          • AKLady2015

            Maybe you should pay closer attention to detail.
            Also, you assume way too much.

          • satcatchet

            Right, Common Since not Common Core.

          • AKLady2015

            What does all that have to do with academic accreditation?

          • satcatchet

            And more of your ignorance to the issue at hand. COMMON CORE TEACHES STUPIDNESS.

          • satcatchet

            Moron. God doesn’t give demeaning gifts.

          • Eileen Ross

            The AKlady creature is just a lonely, pathetic troll who needs to be blocked. I did, and it’s so nice not to see her ignorant prattle.

          • AKLady2015

            Thank you.
            Your input is always welcome
            It says so much about you.

          • AKLady

            Name calling is nursery school behavior.
            I suspect you claim to be a Christian …

          • cindy galt

            We had three children in school during the 70’s & 80’s and are also military. I hated Common Core. Two of our children are now teachers themselves and also hate it. We need to get back to the basics and let the teachers teach!

          • AKLady2015

            Common Core was not developed until 2009.

          • cindy galt

            My first two, along with a daughter-in-law only have to teach it, my third is the one who had to suffer through it.

          • AKLady

            Your relatives taught in school systems that provided substandard education in some areas? By some chance, were they employed by the Milwaukee School System? In Milwaukee. inner city schools had less than one book for every ten students. In contrast, rich Whitefish Bay schools handed out personal computers.

            Maybe you should actually research what Common Core actually requires. It is about standards, http://www.corestandards.org/

          • cindy galt

            No, still having to teach that crap here in GA, and now my grandson has to suffer through it. Thank goodness his mother, the teacher, can lead him in the right direction at home.

          • AKLady

            The public school system was not designed for the top 10%. If your children do not appreciate what the taxpayer is giving them, they can send their young ones to private school.

          • cindy galt

            You are full of crap. We ARE the tax payer and the school system is NOT “giving” me anything. It sounds like you think public schools are only for the dumb and poor. Public schools should be for every student. This is what Common Core has done to our schools and why so many parents want to home school their children or like you say, send them to a private school. Get rid of Common Core and at least one of the many problems teachers face will be done away with.

          • AKLady

            Yet, another one, who has no idea what “Common Core” actually is. Was the school your child attended even accredited? If so, was the accreditation regional or national?
            Common core simply makes accreditation a level playing ground. Either your school makes the grade, or it does not. You seem to think Common Core lowers education levels, You have been well-brainwashed.

          • Strongboy1770

            If we don’t nourish the top, we will not be able to compete. Until the public schools provide a quality education for EVERYONE, public money should not be going to private schools.

          • AKLady

            There are gifted programs at almost all schools. Those lacking such programs are usually found in poor neighborhoods.

          • Lillyhammer Lip

            AMEN to that!

        • Marvin2514

          Common core has always been about dumbing down even further of kids. It also supports islam and many parents are right to be concerned about that.

        • Klaus Krauthammer

          You don’t know how correct you are.

        • Correct, you are! It’s always been about Cover Your Assets, with the Democratic sponsored Teacher’s Unions. But no matter how many millions were thrown into Programs and Salary’s, under Progressive minded programs, education progressively Got Worse! Discipline, Educational Fundamentals, and Accountability ( by students as well as teachers), backed up by Parental involvement (in support of student development- not alibiing of poor performance)- that is traditionally what leads to student success, and good schools. Parochial schools, charter schools in big city Ghettos, and even a few traditionally-minded public schools,hear and there, have proved that, positively,through the decades. Will a Liberal ever admit that: not likely.

      • Klaus Krauthammer

        It’s liberal tolerance all the way. They are void of common sense. They are cranial rectally reversed and test results are in. You can throw all the money in the universe at public education but the kids have to take books home and do homework. A large percentage of them don’t and the inner cities bring down the national test scores. It’s simple hard work. I blame the parents for the most part not working their students at home. It’s not the teachers fault usually.

        • DarwinsMyth

          At the school where my 3rd grader was going to, I can’t count the days that she was given the go ahead to play hooky, with the school’s blessings, while still being at school. For example, I asked her,”What did the teacher teach you today?”. She said, math. I asked… “Anything else?”. She said… only math. There are many more examples that I can give.

        • AKLady2015

          s ans, Klaus, in poor neighborhoods, as many as ten children share one textbook. Homework? There is no way for teachers to accomplish that. Of the school cannot afford enough textbooks, they certainly cannot affords to print worksheets.
          .
          We have “inner cities” because of the mass suburban exodus of the 1950s and 1950s.

          • DarwinsMyth

            Schools can’t afford textbooks or printed worksheets, but they can afford computers and computer tablets? Computers usually need to be updated yearly, so there’s even more money spent… text books and worksheets don’t.

          • AKLady2015

            Pay closer attention
            In some areas, school funds are disbursed in proportion to the tax base. Upper economic areas get more school funding. Poor areas are provided less.

          • Warren Blum

            And the problem is?

          • AKLady2015

            Generational poverty is guaranteed.
            Unemployment numbers will continue to be elevated.
            Public assistance levels will remain high.
            Crime will increase.
            Infants will continue to be malnourished. …

          • DarwinsMyth

            Are you making excuses for why Common Core is a big failure? You’ve already said, Common Core makes everything equal for the kids, so they’re all learning at the same pace in all the districts, nationwide, so when / if kids move to another school district, they won’t be left behind. Common Core is dumbing down our children.

          • Warren Blum

            Zones of transition, yes, but! Environmentally handicapped neighborhoods are so riddled with crime and other factors it’s a waste of money to educate them. Hence bussing which opened doors to other problems. I don’t think any amount of money can produce intelligence with the system in place now.

          • AKLady2015

            More false statements.

            Busing has nothing to do with “environmentally handicapped neighborhoods.” It was begun in the 1960s. It has everythign to d with desegregation.
            .
            Get a better history education.

          • Warren Blum

            I said it opened up other problems. Yeah ur scumbag pal lbj created a nightmare. Better history lesson? Take a walk in a ghetto and really educate urself.

          • satcatchet

            Your a lunitic.
            You cannot even compose one paragraph of intelligence. Try rereading, if you can, what you just posted. It appears that you are a result of common core.

          • AKLady2015

            Please obtain the services of a mental health professional. Save your insults for someone you can impress. You have been blocked.

          • satcatchet

            That’s it, run to mommy and daddy and take you libtard blocks with you. You a disgrace to humanity. You dug your own hole so suck it up butter cup.
            Run along now for grown-ups are talking, move on now.

          • patroklos

            That would be “you’re,” not “your.” Seems you don’t meet your own standards, dear.

      • satcatchet

        No it was not started in the ’70s.
        Common Core is part of Agenda 21. Check the inception date of Agenda 21.

        • AKLady2015

          Yet another conspiracy theory.
          Not one has ever come to pass in my life time.

          • satcatchet

            Because of your CLEP exam.

      • mikey2046

        Where in the Constitution is public education the responsibility of the federal government? Schools and school boards are local, and locally funded. The federal government has no business being involved in education. The Department of Education was established by Carter as payback for teachers’ unions support.

        • AKLady

          Your school accepts federal money.

    • Lisajmiranda

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    • patroklos

      That would be “their,” not “there.” What’s your excuse?

      • Klaus Krauthammer

        Good catch Patroklos.

      • minefinder624

        Keyboarding ! strikes again.!!!

  • Warren Blum

    Doesn’t matter, this under 35 is already stupid, brainless and clueless.

  • Randy

    I thought common core was to be gone by now. I have never seen such garbage in my life.

    • Lillyhammer Lip

      Garbage indeed! Only democrats can screw things up. They could and would screw up a porta-potty!

  • DarwinsMyth

    I’m hoping that I heard this wrong, but I heard recently, (somewhere), that Common Core is pushed because it makes it easier for Muslims to learn. This is the U.S.A…. not the Middle-east. Only the backward mind of a Muslim can understand Common Core….

    I just Googled, that Common Core has its ties with some Muslim countries, like Libya, Qatar, and Saudi Arabia. Thank you, Barack Insane Obama.

  • andnowyoudont

    If a person can’t write/read cursive, our Founding Documents are gibberish to them. Ergo– ignorance promotes servitude, which will “morph” into oppression in short order.

    • Strongboy1770

      Nonsense. We all learned the Constitution from printed transcriptions, perhaps with the antiquated spelling, grammar and syntax corrected, which is different from translating a document into another language. To someone fluent in Hebrew, English translations of the Bible are BAAAD, but nothing is lost in transcribing from the ancient Hebrew alphabet to the post-exilic one in common use today.

      • satcatchet

        I think andnowyoudont was referring to readinging the Constitution in it’s original writing. You know, for posterity reasons.

  • PCS
  • Frederick Douglass

    The reason that dems want to stop children writing is because it makes children smarter.

    • DarwinsMyth

      All indications show that the U.S. is becoming a 3rd world nation, and its educational system is a big reason for it. We only need to see the protestors on the news, whining for their freebies, instead of getting a job to pay for them.

      • satcatchet

        Bingo. You hit Common Core squarely on its head. That’s the NWO’s Agenda 21 aim. Dumb them down and the nation will be easy picking.

  • Gregg Parker

    It was only the very same shallow thinkers that have been calling the critical thinkers “uneducated rednecks”. How fitting.

  • Brian Dombroski

    Common core bad,Demorats bad,Trump good.

  • Louie Rey

    To be honest with you it’s been so long since I went to school that this Common Core thing is completely alien to me. I have no idea what its standards are or what it’s goals are for students. So, for one of the few times, I have no opinion on this topic but it does remind me of an old Rodney Dangerfield joke. He said that his “wife is so old that when she went to school they didn’t have history!” I miss him.

  • Angel Honts

    Common Core is only a set of standards. It does not prescribe how schools and teachers should teach these standards. Common Core does not require or prohibit cursive. The problem is time. There isn’t enough time to meet all students’ needs sometimes. Teachers have to be creative to combine multiple subjects to get all the required curriculum taught in a school day. However it’s NOT Common Core that decides what curriculum to use.

  • daveveselenak

    Common Core = Communist Collaboration! Dumb them down and drug them up is what they are doing and it is working to a tee as we see what is occurring in the colleges! REVOLUTION will be the SOLUTION – guaranteed!

  • Yay, yay, yay. Go teachers, go.
    Teach cursive.

  • therealworld

    Who needs Cursive, all the letters on a box of Twinkies are in Print. Same with expanded math skills, the register will tell the losers how much change to give back at their McyD Jobs. Kids don’t even know phone numbers, the new phones do it for you and channels on a TV, everyone will have “Alexis”

    Were handing the planet over to the “Dunce’s” that used to be in the corner..

    • Nonpc

      Agreed, I think that is the point. The direction public education is headed is toward decreasing standards rather than raising them, which is pathetic based upon how much tax payer money goes to fund it. Kids are being dumbed down and Americans are being left behind compared to other civilized nations: http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/02/15/u-s-students-internationally-math-science/. Many are and will be unprepared for trade school or college and unable to function and get real jobs, ultimately resulting in dependence upon the government and more Democrat votes. A win-win situation for leftists.